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Grace After Dinner
A Dog's Religion
His Duel With Captain D'esterre
The Upstart
His Birth
Wisdom
A Certificate Of Marriage
The Serenading Lover
A Courtier's Retort
A Mistaken Frenchman


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His Birth
Refusal Of Office
His First Client
Scene Between Fitzgibbon And Curran In The Irish Parliament
O'leary Versus Curran
Dr Sacheverell
Mr Pulteney
His Defence Of Archibald Hamilton Rowan
His Duel With Bully Egan
Curran At A Debating Society


Random Irish Humour

Use Of Red Tape
His Charity
The Monks Of The Screw
O'connell And A Bilking Client
Curran And The Banker
O'leary And The Rector
Epistolary Bores
Swift's Behavior At Table
Curran And The Informer
Short Charity Sermon




Swift's Last Lines

Irish Humour Home




In one of those lucid intervals which varied the course of Swift's
unhappy lunacy, his guardians or physicians took him out to give him an
airing. When they came to the Phoenix park, Swift remarked a new building
which he had never seen, and asked what it was designed for? Dr.
Kingsbury answered, That, Mr. Dean, is the magazine for arms and
powder, for the security of the city. Oh! oh! says the dean, pulling
out his pocket-book, let me take an item of that. This is worth
remarking; my tablets, as Hamlet says, my tablets--memory, put down
that. He then produced the following lines, being the last he ever
wrote:

Behold! a proof of Irish sense!
Here Irish wit is seen,
When nothing's left for our defence,
We build a magazine.

The Dean then put up his pocket-book, laughing heartily at the conceit,
and clenching it with, After the steed's stolen, shut the stable
door.





Next: His Birth

Previous: Swift At Thomastown



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