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Grace After Dinner
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The Dean And Faulkner

Irish Humour Home






George Faulkner, the Dublin printer, once called on Dean Swift on his
return from London, dressed in a rich coat of silk brocade and gold
lace, and seeming not a little proud of the adorning of his person: the
Dean determined to humble him. When he entered the room, and saluted the
Dean with all the respectful familiarity of an old acquaintance, the
Dean affected not to know him; in vain did he declare himself as George
Faulkner, the Dublin printer; the Dean declared him an impostor, and at
last abruptly bade him begone. Faulkner, perceiving the error he had
committed, instantly returned home, and resuming his usual dress, again
went to the Dean, when he was very cordially received. Ah, George,
said he, I am so glad to see you, for here has been an impudent
coxcomb, bedizened in silks and gold lace, who wanted to pass himself
off for you; but I soon sent the fellow about his business; for I knew
you to be always a plain dressed and honest man, just as you now
appear before me.





Next: Swift Arbuthnot And Parnell

Previous: His Saturnalia



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