Fenelon





The venerable Archbishop of Cambray, whose humanity was
unbounded, was in the constant habit of visiting the cottages of the

peasants, and administering consolation and relief in their distress. When

they were driven from their habitations by the alarms of war, he received

them into his house, and served them at his table. During the war, his

house was always open to the sick and wounded, whom he lodged and provided

with every thing necessary for their relief. Besides his constant

hospitalities to the military, he performed a most munificent act of

patriotism and humanity after the disastrous winter of 1709, by opening his

granaries and distributing gratuitously corn to the value of 100,000

livres. And when his palace at Cambray, and all his books and furniture,

were destroyed by fire, he bore it with the utmost firmness, saying, "It is

better all these should be burned, than the cottage of one poor family."





Fear of Death Filial Affection facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Feedback