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A Martial Judge

Irish Humour Home




In Court his usual mirth and ready wit never failed him; and he kept
the bar and listening by-standers in constant hilarity. He made an
excellent hit during the trial of Sir George Bingham, for assault,
during the tithe agitation. The General's Aide-de-Camp, Captain Berners,
of the Royal Artillery, was under examination. A junior counsel asked
the witness, What is the meaning of the military phrase, 'ride him
down?'

Do you think, interposed O'Connell, we are here to get an explanation
of plain English from an English Aide-de-Camp, with his tongue in
holiday dress? then turning to the witness, he said, You belong to the
Artillery and understand horse language?--Yes. Mr. Justice Moore, who
tried the case, here observed--I ought to understand it, Mr. O'Connell,
for I was a long while Captain of cavalry. Yes you were, my lord,
replied O'Connell, and I recollect you a long time a Sergeant, too.
This ready sally caused a burst of laughter throughout the whole court.





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