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Curran And The Farmer

Irish Humour Home




A farmer attending a fair with a hundred pounds in his pocket, took the
precaution of depositing it in the hands of the landlord of the
public-house at which he stopped. Next day he applied for the money, but
the host affected to know nothing of the business. In this dilemma the
farmer consulted Curran. Have patience, my friend, said the counsel;
speak to the landlord civilly, and tell him you are convinced you must
have left your money with some other person. Take a friend with you, and
lodge with him another hundred, and then come to me. The dupe doubted
the advice; but, moved by the authority or rhetoric of the learned
counsel, he at length followed it. And now, sir, said he to Cumin, I
don't see as I am to be better off for this, if I get my second hundred
again; but how is that to be done? Go and ask him for it when he is
alone, said the counsel. Ay, sir, but asking won't do, I'ze afraid,
without my witness, at any rate. Never mind, take my advice, said
Curran; do as I bid you, and return to me. The farmer did so, and came
back with his hundred, glad at any rate to find that safe again in his
possession. Now, sir, I suppose I must be content; but I don't see as I
am much better off. Well, then, said the counsel, now take your
friend with you, and ask the landlord for the hundred pounds your friend
saw you leave with him. It need not be added, that the wily landlord
found that he had been taken off his guard, whilst the farmer returned
exultingly to thank his counsel, with both hundreds in his pocket.





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