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Grace After Dinner
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The Upstart
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Grace After Dinner




Chief Justice Whitshed's Motto On His Coach

Irish Humour Home




Libertas et natale solum.
Liberty and my native country.

Libertas et natale solum;
Fine words! I wonder where you stole 'em:
Could nothing but thy chief reproach
Serve for a motto on thy coach?
But let me now the words translate:
Natale solum:--my estate:
My dear estate, how well I love it!
My tenants, if you doubt, will prove it.
They swear I am so kind and good,
I hug them till I squeeze their blood.
Libertas bears a large import:
First, how to swagger in a court;
And, secondly, to show my fury
Against an uncomplying Jury;
And, thirdly, 'tis a new invention
To favor Wood, and keep my pension:
And fourthly, 'tis to play an odd trick,
Get the Great Seal, and turn out Brod'rick.
And, fifthly, you know whom I mean,
To humble that vexatious Dean;
And, sixthly, for my soul to barter it
For fifty times its worth to Carteret.
Now since your motto thus you construe,
I must confess you've spoken once true.
Libertas et natale solum,
You had good reason when you stole 'em.





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