On the threshold of one of the doors of Smithills Hall there is a bloody footstep impressed into the door-step, and ruddy as if the bloody foot had just trodden there; and it is averred that, on a certain night of the year, and at a certai... Read more of The Bloody Footstep at Scary Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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O'connell And A Bilking Client

Irish Humour Home






He used to lodge, when at Cork, at a stationer's of the name of O'Hara,
in Patrick-street, one of the principal thoroughfares of the city.
There, during the Assizes, there was always a crowd before his door,
lounging under his windows, anxious to get a peep at the Counsellor.
Whenever he made his appearance there was always a hearty cheer. On one
occasion, an old friend of his, who had once belonged to the bar, Mr.
K----, a member of a most respectable family, called on O'Connell during
the Assizes, to pay him a friendly visit. He found O'Connell engaged
with a shrewd-looking farmer, who was consulting him on a knotty case.
Heartily glad to see his old friend, O'Connell sprang forward, saying,
My dear K----, I'm delighted to see you. The farmer, seeing the
visitor come in, cunningly took the opportunity of sneaking away. He had
got what he wanted--the opinion; but O'Connell had not got what he
wanted--the fee. O'Connell at once followed the farmer, who had got the
start by a flight of stairs. The rustic quickened his pace when he found
that the counsellor was in chase. O'Connell saw that he could not catch
the runaway client, who was now on the flight leading into the hall. He
leant over the bannister, and made a grasp at the farmer's collar, but,
instead of the collar, he caught the rustic's wig, which came away in
his hand. O'Connell gave a shout of laughter, and, quick as thought,
jumped in high spirits back to his room. Hurrah! see, K----, I've got
the rascal's wig. Up went the window--

Three cheers for the counsellor!--Long life to your honor. Arrah! isn't
he the man of the people.

Ah! boys, said O'Connell, with glee, look here what I've got for you!
Here's the wig of a rascal that has just bilked me of a fee.

Shouts of laughter rent the air, as the wig was pitched out, to undergo
a rapid process of radical reform at the hands of the mob. As the
wigless farmer made his appearance, he was received with groans of
derision, and was glad enough to escape with unbroken bones.





Next: Sow-west And The Wigs

Previous: His Encounter With Biddy Moriarty



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